Digilent Introduces FPGA-based Signal Processing System

These trending applications employ high-speed analog inputs and/or outputs where real-time signal processing is required, driving the need for higher precision and higher speed solutions. Digilent’s latest Eclypse Z7 Ecosystem is ideal for high-speed instrumentation, control and measurement systems for edge-computing, medical and communications applications.

With the Eclypse Z7 system, engineers and developers can experiment with different signal processing techniques. Digilent provides an example project which showcases the implementation of a Zynq-based 32-order finite impulse response (FIR) filter design on Linux. The 32-order FIR filter, clock-enabled generator and a signal generator are implemented in the programmable logic of the Xilinx Zynq 7000 SoC.

Vivado is a powerful development tool. My university teaches a basic logic design course using Verilog, Vivado IDE, and BASYS3. Towards the end of the quarter, students in the labs spend an unreasonable number of lab hours waiting for simulation results to be processed and for bitstreams to be compiled. These operation are NOT multithreaded using the version of Vivado made available to the class.

I recently upgraded from a Digilent Spartan-3E board. I appreciate the extra capability of the Artix-7 series over the Spartan-3E. The smaller form factor is also nice. I do miss some of the on-board perhipherals like the dial encoder, Ethernet mags, and LCD display. I had some trouble with Vivado connecting to the board but tech support via the forums was very helpful.

The ecosystem comes an application note which serves as a tutorial for the implementation of signal processing system. Apart from the Eclypse Z7 ecosystem, Analog Discovery 2, a multi-instruments test and measurement device is also used to generate analog signals and visualize output signals in the frequency domain.

If it works, it is a lot of fun. Sadly, sometimes it does not implement the program and if we exchange the board it works. I don’t know whether our board is an exception, but it is quite frustrating,

These trending applications employ high-speed analog inputs and/or outputs where real-time signal processing is required, driving the need for higher precision and higher speed solutions. Digilent’s latest Eclypse Z7 Ecosystem is ideal for high-speed instrumentation, control and measurement systems for edge-computing, medical and communications applications.

With the Eclypse Z7 system, engineers and developers can experiment with different signal processing techniques. Digilent provides an example project which showcases the implementation of a Zynq-based 32-order finite impulse response (FIR) filter design on Linux. The 32-order FIR filter, clock-enabled generator and a signal generator are implemented in the programmable logic of the Xilinx Zynq 7000 SoC.

If it works, it is a lot of fun. Sadly, sometimes it does not implement the program and if we exchange the board it works. I don’t know whether our board is an exception, but it is quite frustrating.

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